News : 2016/09

2016/09/29

The Missing One

Gaganendranath Tagore, Resurrection, circa 1922. Courtesy of the Samdani Art Foundation.

Norsk versjon

OCA ANNOUNCES

The Missing One
Curated by Nada Raza

Opening dates:
Thursday 27 October 2016 – Sunday 15 January 2017

Opening hours: Wed–Sun: 11:00–17:00

Office for Contemporary Art Norway
Nedre gate 7, 0551 Oslo
www.oca.no I info@oca.no

OCA is pleased to present ‘The Missing One’. Taking the tropes and technologies of science fiction as a thematic beginning, this inter-galactic, inter-generational exhibition assembles artworks from across Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

The exhibition, specially produced by OCA for this presentation in Oslo, is part of an institutional concern to bring to Norway the plurality of practices and histories at the forefront of international artistic debates around the world. As such, 'The Missing One' stands within a wider impetus to focus on the South Asia region and beyond, which was initiated through The Critical Writing Ensembles, a project to commission, debate and publish critical writing. Launched in Baroda, India, in 2015, and in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 2016, the Ensembles invited art writing peers from the region and beyond (including Norway) to discuss comparative art histories and writing practices. In 2018 this focus on South Asia will be followed by a solo exhibition of the seminal Indian artist Vivan Sundaram.

The exhibition’s perspectives are guided by a 1920s painting by Gaganendranath Tagore referencing the science fiction short novel The Story of The Missing One by J.C. Bose. The Missing One was published in 1896, and is thought to be one of the first science fiction stories in the Bengali language. A research scientist, Bose pioneered wireless communication and a crater on the moon bears his name. Tagore’s Resurrection, from which the exhibition departs, looks skyward to imagine a cosmological vortex in the heavens.

In the 20th century, speculative fiction and cinema allowed expression for the wonder and anxieties of the encounter with an ever-accelerating modernity. Future worlds became possible even as hostile aliens, dystopian planets and galactic conflict echoed the real schisms of earthbound life. Exotic references added esoteric appeal – for Arthur C Clarke, the ancient palace complex of Sigiriya in Sri Lanka became a portal and Rama lent his name to a spaceship. The extra-terrestrial or non-human, even in popular film and TV, became a composite of non-western traits.

Re-territorialising these memes, the exhibition speculates whether a South Asian view can be articulated by assembling and repositioning works that speak to the themes and aesthetics of the genre. It troubles the modern view that science and spirituality must remain at odds. The exhibition hopes to connect with counter narratives, such as Afro-futurism; and present opportunities for the reappraisal of the global encounter with the modern and the concept of alienation. Astral journeys, cosmological quests, astronomical explorations, alien encounters, nihilistic visions, retro-futurist experiments and a need to reimagine the future are all addressed by artists who have experienced the wonder, the hubris and excesses of the space age from a slightly different tilt on the universe.

Participating artists include Ronni Ahmmed, David Chalmers Alesworth, Shishir Bhattacharjee, Fahd Burki, Neha Choksi, Iftikhar Dadi and Elizabeth Dadi, Rohini Devasher, Marzia Farhana, Aamir Habib, Zihan Karim, Ali Kazim, Sanjeewa Kumara, Firoz Mahmud, Mehreen Murtaza, Saskia Pintelon, Sahej Rahal, Tejal Shah, Himali Singh Soin, Mariam Suhail and Hajra Waheed.

On the opening night OCA’s Director Katya García-Antón will give an introduction, followed by a tour of the exhibition by Nada Raza. After the tour there will be a talk between artist and academic Iftikhar Dadi, writer and curator Nida Ghouse and exhibition curator Nada Raza.

The first iteration of 'The Missing One' was presented within the Dhaka Art Summit in 2016, with the support of the Samdani Art Foundation.

For more information, please contact OCA’s Communication Manager Tara Hassel.

OCA'S NOTATIONS
’The Missing One’, in Oslo, is part of OCA’s continuous programming: Notations. OCA's 'Notations' unfold as a series of programmatic activities – performing, writing, thinking, fragmenting, exhibiting, moving, eating and socialising – that explore the desire for the institution to reflect upon the potential for artistic practice as an alchemical sphere of public action.

Related

2016/09/19

Upcoming application deadline for funding and residency opportunities

Anna Daniell, The Flock of Problems (2016). Static sculpture theatre presented at Akademirommet, Oslo National Academy of the Arts. The project was also presented at Cabaret der Künstler - Zunfthaus Voltaire, Manifesta 11, with support from OCA.

OCA ANNOUNCES

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FOR

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT FOR GALLERIES AND INDEPENDENT EXHIBITION SPACES (ISGIES)

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCIES
Wiels Residency Programme, Brussels, Belgium

Deadline: 1 October 2016

www.oca.no/grants

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT
OCA is currently accepting applications for the third round out of three application reviews during 2016 for International Support. Applications are accepted from Norwegian artists, international artists residing in Norway and non-profit arts organisations. Priority is given to exhibitions taking place in key international art institutions and project spaces. Support is also extended to solo exhibitions and group exhibitions initiated by international curators as well as to Norwegian art professionals organising exhibitions and projects abroad. The funding for International Support is provided by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Click here for more information and for application forms.

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT FOR GALLERIES AND INDEPENDENT EXHIBITION SPACES (ISGIES)
OCA is currently accepting applications for the third round out of three application reviews during 2016 for International Support for Galleries and Independent Exhibition Spaces (ISGIES). ISGIES is initiated and funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture and administered by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) for the promotion of Norwegian galleries and independent exhibition spaces in international art fairs and temporary exhibition arenas. The grant should stimulate international efforts for galleries and independent exhibition spaces based in Norway to promote Norwegian contemporary art abroad, particularly with respect to participation in renowned international art fairs, as well as in temporary exhibition arenas. Click here for more information and application forms. 


The applications for International Support and ISGIES will be assessed by an international jury appointed by OCA. 
The following application deadlines are 1 May and 1 October 2017.

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCIES
Wiels Residency Programme
In 2017 OCA offers a residency programme for an artist at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre in Brussels, Belgium. The duration of the programme is nine months, from 1 April until 31 December 2017. Applications are accepted from Norwegian artists and international artists residing in Norway. The programme is designed for artists who have already elaborated a specific and promising aesthetic language but seek artistic, theoretical and professional support in order to develop their practice. Please notice that the residency is not available for BA or MA students. Applications will be assessed by an International Jury appointed by OCA, together with a representative from WIELS Contemporary Art Centre. Click here for more information.

For more information, please contact Anne Charlotte Hauen.

About Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) 

OCA is a foundation created by the Norwegian Ministries of Culture and of Foreign Affairs in 2001 with the aim of developing cultural collaborations between Norway and the international arts scene. OCA aims to become one of the main organs in the international contemporary arts debate through initiatives such as exhibitions, seminars and publications, as well as by providing support to Norwegian artists for their activities in the international art arena, and by inviting international curators and artists to Norway. OCA has been responsible for Norway's contribution to the visual arts section of la Biennale di Venezia since 2001.

2016/09/13

Artists-curator talk in Tromsø

Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli

Norsk versjon

OCA ANNOUNCES

A conversation between National Museum's curator Ingvild Krogvig and artists Oddvar I.N. Daren and Lars Paalgard

Thursday 15 September 2016, 19:00

The Polar Museum
UiT – The Arctic University of Norway
Søndre Tollbodgate 11
9008 Tromsø, Norway

www.oca.no

As part of the ongoing programme 'Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’, OCA is hosting a conversation between The National Museum’s curator of contemporary art Ingvild Krogvig and artists Oddvar I.N. Daren and Lars Paalgard on Thursday 15 September at 19:00 at the Polar Museum in Tromsø. The discussion will depart from Oddvar I.N. Daren and Lars Paalgard’s Humus Line (1984) which is included in the exhibition 'Silent Revolt: Norwegian Process Art and Conceptual Art in the 1970s and 80s' curated by Krogvig on view at The Museum of Contemporary Art (The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo) from 4 March to 18 September 2016.

The Humus Line was created when Daren and Paalgard were studying at the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht, the Netherlands. One day they found an abandoned old rubber recycling factory of about 5000 m2. After inspecting the compound left in the hall, they felt a need to organise the material in a long trail of rubber scraps, glass shards, wood, straw, sand, stones and dust, which Daren and Paalgard had swept together in a run-off trough in the middle of the 100-meter long factory floor. They also composed their first Manifesto Ars Situare. Ars Situare, described as 'a philosophy of perception whose aim is to abolish a one-sided definition of phenomena, thereby permitting active communication between subject and object – on an imaginative and creative level'. Ars Situare (art in-situ) also alludes to what is left behind, a left-behind art.

When the Humus Line was firstly shown in an exhibition space for the diploma exam at the van Eyck Academie, the scrap material was placed together with photographs of the original humus line. The work was accompanied by a concrete poem in which the artists listed and analysed the contents of every meter of the work. The artwork Humus Line poetically addresses issues of industrialisation, detritus, pollution, and the world’s interconnection of waters and currents. Part of the artists’ concern and experimentation was to reach the northernmost archipelago under Norwegian sovereignty, Svalbard, and open up current and historical questions around the term and practice of conceptual art in Norway and globally.

The upcoming Tromsø evening conversation will commence with a poetry reading by Sámi poet, musician, actor and activist Niillas Holmberg.

This discussion is curated by OCA in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art (The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo), and co-organised with The Polar Museum, Tromsø Museum and UiT – The Arctic University of Tromsø. This event also coincides with and marks the first OCA Board meeting being held in the OCA offices in Tromsø. Please note that the conversation will be held in Norwegian.

For more information, please contact OCA’s Communication Manager Tara Hassel.


About the Speakers

Oddvar I.N. Daren is an artist working across genres with paintings, objects, sculptures and land art. He received his education from the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, Norway (1977–81) and the Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht, The Netherlands (1982–84). He has held solo exhibitions at Bodø Kunstforening, Norway (2015); Trondheims Kunstforening, Trondheim (2013); Galleri F15, Moss, Norway (1986) and Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Bærum, Norway (1985). He was selected as the 1995 festival artist of the Arctic Arts Festival in Harstad, Norway. His artworks are part of public and private collections across Norway, and he has produced works of public art for schools and sites accross Norway.

Lars Palgaard studied at the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, Trondheim, Norway (1978–82) and the Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht, The Netherlands (1983–85). He has been part of exhibitions in Norway and abroad, and his works is included in public collections such as the Arts Council Norway and the Trondheim kommune (Trondheim municipality).

Ingvild Krogvig is a curator of contemporary art at the The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo where her first exhibition, ‘Silent Revolt: Norwegian Process Art and Conceptual Art in the 1970s and 80s’, is currently on view. She received her Master’s degree in 2009 from the University in Oslo, where she wrote her dissertation on Norwegian conceptual art in the 1970s. Krogvig has been the editor in chief of Kunstkritikk, and a critic and commentator for Morgenbladet, Kunstkritikk, Billedkunst, Vagant and Vinduet as well as she has written several catalogue essays and research articles.

For more information about 'Silent Revolt: Norwegian Process Art and Conceptual Art in the 1970s and 80s’ please click here.


About 'Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’
The event forms part of ‘Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’, a wide cross-disciplinary project exploring the cultural history of Northern Norway, initiated and developed by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA). Structured through a series of regional and international dialogues and partnerships, the project is unfolding in various forms and locations across Norway and beyond, including research, artist residencies, exhibitions, text commissions and a number of activities activated through the new OCA pilot office in Tromsø, and its premises in Oslo.

Related

2016/09/07

James Bridle in conversation with Thomas Keenan at OCA

James Bridle, Rainbow Plane (2014), Kiev, Ukraine

OCA ANNOUNCES

Resident artist James Bridle in conversation with Bard College Professor Thomas Keenan

Saturday 10 September 2016, 16:00

Office for Contemporary Art Norway
Nedre gate 7, 0551 Oslo
www.oca.no I info@oca.no

OCA is pleased to announce a talk with OCA ISP resident artist, James Bridle, who will be in conversation with Thomas Keenan, Director of the Human Rights Project and Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Human Rights Program at Bard College, New York, NY, USA. The talk is organised by Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) in collaboration with Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016 'After Belonging: A Triennale In Residence, On Residence and the Ways We Stay in Transit' and The National Museum – Architecture.

How does artistic work intervene or make claims in the political realm? Which kind of role does it take in reaching such an objective?

Raising awareness, expanding imaginations, creating or providing evidence, and giving voice or visibility to otherwise unnoticed positions and subjects, are few of the forms and ways in which one can engage in these operations against the numerous conflicting political agendas of the world today. At a moment when many political campaigns and corporate projects self-consciously adopt ‘aesthetic’ strategies, with or without the participation of artists, to scrutinise the interrelation of aesthetics and politics becomes a civil task. The discussion intensifies when we talk about technology and art interlocked with human rights.

While studying the first Internet war coalescing technology advancements of military information at the turn of the century, almost 15 years ago now, Thomas Keenan wrote that ‘unpredictability and openness of the medium is what makes it a political space, and what exposes those who operate within it to decision, action, and responsibility.’

In his practice as an artist, writer and theorist, James Bridle has investigated modern network infrastructure, and technological surveillance at the intersection of art, science, and political activism. His work incorporates software programming, social media, photography, installations, architectural rendering and maps which unravel politics of surveillance, interstices of escape, and traces left mistakenly by technology, which create a different representation of our physical world.

During this upcoming conversation at OCA in Oslo, Bridle will speak about his practice in a conversation with Professor Keenan, who has analysed in great detail the role of communications technology, writing, imaging, and data storage especially in its effect on civil rights and our perception of possible futures, thus blurring the lines between the virtual and the real.

For more information, please contact OCA’s Communication Manager Tara Hassel.

About James Bridle
James Bridle is a British artist and writer based in Athens, Greece. His artworks have been commissioned by galleries and institutions and exhibited worldwide and on the internet. His writing on literature, culture and networks has appeared in magazines and newspapers including Wired, Domus, Cabinet, the Atlantic, the New Statesman, the Guardian, the Observer and many others, in print and online. He lectures regularly at conferences, universities, and other events. His formulation of the New Aesthetic research project has spurred debate and creative work across multiple disciplines.

Bridle's residency as part of OCA's Studio Programme in March and September 2016 is organised in conjunction with his participation in the Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016.

About Thomas Keenan
Thomas Keenan is an author, Adjunct Associate Professor at Columbia Law School, and Director of the Human Rights Project and Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Human Rights Program at Bard College. He holds a B.A. from Amherst College, a Master of Philosophy and a Ph.D. from Yale University. He is the recipient of the following awards: Fellowship, Center for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture, Rutgers (1991–92); Shorenstein Fellow, Joan Shorenstein Center for Press and Politics, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard (1998). He is the author of Fables of Responsibility: Aberrations and Predicaments in Ethics and Politics (1997); articles in PMLA, New York Times, Wired, Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism, among others. He was the editor of The End(s) of the Museum (1996) and co-editor of New Media, Old Media (2005); (1988). He is an editorial and advisory board member of Journal of Human Rights, Grey Room, WITNESS, Scholars at Risk Network. (1999– ).

OCA ISP – International Studio Programme

International residents (artists, curators and critics) are invited to OCA’s International Studio Programme (ISP) for a period of up to three months. The length of the stay depends on the respective resident’s schedule needs. The resident is provided with a professional studio, an apartment at Ekely (an artists's colony where Edvard Munch built his studio where he lived and worked until his death in 1944) for their stay in Oslo, and additional research possibilities during his or her stay. The residency can be used for independent research, work on a project taking place in Norway, teaching purposes or for other activities in relation to Norwegian contemporary culture. OCA’s ISP programme guests are also invited to extend their residency participation into networked activities in the form of public talks, seminars and presentations organised by OCA and/or at the invitation of other institutions throughout Norway.

In 2016 OCA, under the umbrella of the project 'Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’ has initiated a number of residencies and programmes of readings, performances, lectures and upcoming exhibitions for visiting artists, curators and critics in Northern Norway with the cooperation and support of local institutions.

Oslo Architecture Triennale (OAT) is the Nordic region’s biggest architecture festival, and one of the world’s important arenas for dissemination and discussion of architectural and urban challenges. Through exhibitions, conferences, debates, competitions, publications and events in different formats and media, OAT seeks to challenge the field of architecture, engage the public and inspire local, Nordic and international debates around architecture and urbanism. The Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016 ’After Belonging: A Triennale In Residence, On Residence and the Ways We Stay in Transit' is curated by a group of architects, curators and scholars based in New York, NY, USA, and Rotterdam, The Netherlands, composed by Lluís Alexandre Casanovas Blanco, Ignacio G. Galán, Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, Alejandra Navarrete Llopis and Marina Otero Verzier.

ABOUT OCA'S NOTATIONS
The conversation between James Bridle and Thomas Keenan is part of OCA’s continuous programming Notations. OCA's 'Notations' unfold as a series of programmatic activities – performing, writing, thinking, fragmenting, exhibiting, moving, eating and socialising – that explore the desire for the institution to reflect upon the potential for artistic practice as an alchemical sphere of public action.

Related