News : 2017/01

2017/01/25

Highlights of 2017: a year of Indigenous art and thought

Arvid Sveen, Frigjøring (Liberation), 1972–81. Courtesy of the artist.

Norsk versjon Sámegiel veršuvdna

OCA ANNOUNCES

Highlights of 2017: a year of Indigenous art and thought


Office for Contemporary Art Norway
Nedre gate 7,
0551 Oslo
www.oca.no I info@oca.no

The Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) is delighted to announce the programme for 2017—a year dedicated to Indigenous art and thought—which marks a commitment to urgent, contemporary Indigenous issues of global importance, and honours the 100th Sami Jubilee which will commence in Tråante (South Sami for Trondheim) on February 6, 2017.

The 2017 programme opens at Small Projects in Tromsø on January 19, with a conversation between Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara and OCA Director Katya García-Antón, addressing the legacy of colonialism on Indigenous communities and their artistic strategies today. Sara’s project Pile o’ Sápmi points to the Norwegian state’s current enforcement of a law that seeks to reduce the reindeer population across northern Norway/Sápmi, and which has been met with strong resistance from the reindeer-herding community.

On 20-21 April, OCA presents 'Museums on Fire' in Oslo and subsequently in Kárášjohka (Northern Sami for Karasjok). Staged within a specially commissioned scenography created by Sami artist Anders Sunna, 'Museums on Fire' is a symposium addressing the entanglement of art institutions with the colonial and modernist ideologies that created them. Artists, curators, academics of Indigenous and non-indigenous descent are asked to consider the spaces and processes through which Indigenous artistic practices, past and present, should be addressed today. What would a non-colonial museum look, feel and sound like? Is it enough to broaden the modernist art historical canon through the politics of inclusion? And is the museum per se an obsolete model for Indigenous practices? Should novel constellations of thought and practice be sought to affirm and mediate the Indigenous discourses of the future? In the light of a marked increase in attention to Indigenous artistic practices across the globe, this question is most profoundly felt and in need of finding appropriate proposals.

Speakers and contributing artists include Raven Chacon, Clementine Deliss, Carola Grahn, Geir Tore Holm, Anna Hudson, Eva Dagny Johansen, Duane Linklater, Anne May Olly and Gerald McMaster. Curated by Katya García-Antón, with Antonio Cataldo.

A second part of the project will feature a historic conversation, entitled ‘Sámiid Vuorká-Dávvirat / The Sami Collections Revisited’, taking place in Kárášjohka/Karasjok in collaboration with RiddoDuottarMuseat (Sami Museums of Western Finnmark) and Sámi Dáiddaguovddáš (Sami Center for Contemporary Art) on 31 May. Artist Geir Tore Holm will conceive and moderate a discussion with RDM founders Alf Isak Keskitalo and Vigdis Stordahl addressing the creation of an inspirational museum concept designed as a site of Sami empowerment.

Led by OCA and OSLO PILOT, the IKT (The International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art) Congress 2017 will take place in Oslo 19–21 May 2017, followed by a post-congress in Tromsø in collaboration with institutions and contemporary art initiatives in the north of Norway/Sápmi. The Congress includes a Symposium which will take the centenary of the first Sami Congress as its starting point—an event which ultimately led to the signing of the Sami Act. The Symposium will go on to address the significance of decolonisation and Indigenous and ecological discourse on contemporary art and related cultural thought around the world.

The Oslo Symposium is curated by Katya García-Antón (Director/Curator OCA), Eva González-Sancho (Curator OSLO PILOT) and Per Gunnar Eeg-Tverbakk (Curator OSLO PILOT), in collaboration with the IKT Board.

OCA’s 2017 programme will culminate with the exhibition 'Let the River Flow. The Sovereign Will and the Making of a New Worldliness' opening in early 2018. The project will discuss the recent history of Sami artistic activism in and across Sápmi (in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia).

'Let the River Flow' takes as its starting point the artistic and activist practices of the radical Máze Sami Artists Group, central to the revolts and unprecedented hunger strikes in protest at the intended damming of the Alta river. The dam built on Norway’s most famous watercourse flooded Sami land of cultural and economic relevance. The exhibition will also present photographic material as well as ephemera from local people’s archive. A younger generation of Sami, as well as other Indigenous and non-indigenous artists and thinkers, will be invited to consider the significance of Alta Action today throughout the world.


About Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA)

The Office for Contemporary Art Norway is a non-profit foundation created by the Norwegian Ministries of Culture and of Foreign Affairs in 2001. Its principle aim is to foster dialogue between art practitioners in Norway and the international arts scene, and support Norwegian artists in their activities around the world. As a result, OCA’s discursive, exhibitional, publishing, residency and visitor programmes focus on bringing the plurality of practices and histories at the forefront of international artistic debates to Norway, insofar as they are concerned with actively participating in such debates nationally and internationally. OCA has been responsible for Norway’s contribution to the visual arts section of the Venice Biennale since 2001.

2017/01/18

Upcoming application deadline for funding and residency opportunities

Elin Már Øyen Vister. Photo: Jasons Rosenberg. Vister will present the installation Soundscape Røst - The Listening Lounge and the new performance The Extinct Jukebox in New Dehli, India in February, with support from OCA.

OCA ANNOUNCES

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FOR

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT FOR GALLERIES AND INDEPENDENT EXHIBITION SPACES (ISGIES)

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCIES 

International Studio Program Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany (artist)
International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP), New York, NY, USA (curator only)

Deadline: 1 February 2017

New grant scheme: International Support for Art Critics, Curators and Text Translation to be announced soon


www.oca.no/grants

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT

OCA is currently accepting applications for the first round out of three application reviews during 2017 for International Support. Applications are accepted from Norwegian artists, international artists residing in Norway and non-profit arts organisations. Priority is given to exhibitions taking place in key international art institutions and project spaces. Support is also extended to solo exhibitions and group exhibitions initiated by international curators as well as to Norwegian art professionals organising exhibitions and projects abroad. The funding for International Support is provided by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Click here for more information and to go to the application forms.

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT FOR GALLERIES AND INDEPENDENT EXHIBITION SPACES (ISGIES)

OCA is currently accepting applications for the first round out of three application reviews during 2017 for International Support for Galleries and Independent Exhibition Spaces (ISGIES). ISGIES is initiated and funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture and administered by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) for the promotion of Norwegian galleries and independent exhibition spaces in international art fairs and temporary exhibition arenas. The grant should stimulate international efforts for galleries and independent exhibition spaces based in Norway to promote Norwegian contemporary art abroad, particularly with respect to participation in renowned international art fairs, as well as in temporary exhibition arenas. Click here for more information and to go to the application forms.

The applications for International Support and ISGIES will be assessed by an international jury appointed by OCA. The following application deadlines are 1 May and 1 October 2017.

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCIES 
 


Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany
In 2017–18 OCA offers a twelve-month residency programme for an artist at the International Studio Programme Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, from 1 December 2017 until 15 November 2018. Applications are accepted from Norwegian artists and international artists residing in Norway. Please notice that the residency is not available for BA or MA students. Applications will be assessed by an international jury appointed by OCA, and by representatives from Künstlerhaus Bethanien. Click here to read more about Künstlerhaus Bethanien.

ISCP, New York, NY, USA
OCA offers one studio grant for a Norwegian curator at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP) in New York, NY, USA. The residency has a duration of 3 months, from 1 September until 30 November 2017. Only Norwegian citizens are eligible for these grants. Please notice that the residency is not available for BA or MA students. Applications will be assessed by an international jury appointed by OCA, and by representatives from ISCP.

Please notice that we do not accept artist applications for ISCP New York this year. Click here for more.


For any further questions, please contact Anne Charlotte Hauen.

About Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) 

The Office for Contemporary Art Norway is a non-profit foundation created by the Norwegian Ministries of Culture and of Foreign Affairs in 2001. Its principle aim is to foster dialogue between art practitioners in Norway and the international arts scene, and support Norwegian artists in their activities around the world. As a result OCA’s discursive, exhibition, publication, residency and visitor programmes focus on bringing to Norway the plurality of practices and histories at the forefront of international artistic debates, as much as they are concerned with actively participating in such debates nationally and internationally. OCA has been responsible for Norway's contribution to the visual arts section of La Biennale di Venezia since 2001.

2017/01/13

A conversation with Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara and Katya García-Antón

Photo: OCA / Cultureshock Media

Norsk versjon Sámegiel veršuvdna

Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara discusses her work in conversation with OCA Director Katya García-Antón
With an acoustic performance by Sami musician Elle Márjá Eira

Thursday 19 January 2017, 19:30 – 20:30

Small Projects
Grønnegata 23
9008 Tromsø
Norway


With the screening of a series of short films commissioned by OCA

Thursday 19 January 2017, 18:00 – 21:00

Tromsø bibliotek og byarkiv (Tromsø Library)
Grønnegata 94
9008 Tromsø
Norway

OCA is pleased to present Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara in a conversation about her work with the OCA Director Katya García-Antón.

Within the backdrop of the marked increased attention to indigenous artistic practice across the globe, Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara will address the legacy of colonialism on indigenous communities and their artistic strategies today within a planetary context. Sara is part of a new generation of Sami artists who are asserting the rights of their community through artistic practices.

Her art project ‘Pile o’ Sápmi’ is scheduled to open in Tromsø on 23 January with an intense week of programming. Selected artworks from ‘Pile o´Sapmi´ will be on view at various venues around Tromsø, both in galleries and public spaces. Máret Ánne Sara’s art installation ‘Pile o’ Sápmi’ addresses recent historical pressure on indigenous herders and animal populations across resourceful regions inhabited by natives. In particular, it aims to address the Norwegian state’s current enforcement of a law that seeks to reduce the reindeer population across northern Norway/Sápmi, and which has met with strong resistance from the reindeer-herding community. Furthermore, this talk and the exhibition opening subsequently in Tromsø will take place within the context of a court case initiated by Sara’s reindeer-herding brother Jovsset Ánte Sara (b. 1992) in protest at the enforced decimation of his herd. Jovsset Ánte Sara won the case in March 2015, but the Norwegian government appealed. The second hearing will take place this time in Tromsø.

The discussion with Máret Ánne Sara at Small Projects marks a commitment by OCA to urgent, contemporary indigenous issues of global importance, which are a prelude to the Sami 100th jubilee, and whose official celebrations will commence on 6 February 2017 in Tråante (Tråante is South Sami for Trondheim).*

The event will open with an acoustic performance by the musician Elle Márjá Eira.

In tandem with the discussion at Small Projects, from 18:00 to 21:00 OCA will screen five portraits, short films commissioned as part of OCA’s project ‘Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’, at the Tromsø bibliotek og byarkiv (Tromsø Library). The short films, with a total screening time of 30 minutes, document artistic and activist thinking in Sápmi among members of the legendary Máze Sami Artist Group and today’s emerging generations. Click here to preview the films.

For more information, please contact OCA’s Communication Manager Tara Hassel.

For information about the weekly programme of ‘Pile o´ Sápmi’ in Tromsø, please visit www.daiddadallu.com

For details on the exhibition ‘Pile o´ Sápmi’, which will open on 24 January at Small Projects, please contact info@smallprojects.no.


Máret Ánne Sara
Máret Ánne Sara is a Sámi artist educated both within journalism and the arts. As an editor and indigenous journalist, she has covered indigenous issues around the world, while her creative mind has observed and picked up artistic influences internationally. Máret Ánne comes from a traditional reindeer-herding family situated in the heart of the Sápmi region. She studied art/illustration in the UK, and product design in Guovdageaidnu (Guovdageaidnu is North Sami for Kautokeino), where she currently lives and works. Máret Ánne has designed visuals for Sámi artists and fashion designers. She is a published novelist and has exhibited in the field of visual arts since 2003. She is one of the founding members of the Dáiddadállu/ Artists Collective Kautokeino.

About 'Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’
The event forms part of ‘Thinking at the Edge of the World. Perspectives from the North’, a broad cross-disciplinary project exploring the cultural history of Northern Norway, curated by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA). Structured through a series of regional and international dialogues and partnerships, the project is unfolding in various forms and locations across Norway and beyond, including research, artists’ residencies, exhibitions, text commissions and a number of activities implemented through an OCA pilot office in Tromsø as well as its premises in Oslo.

* 100 years ago, on 6 February 1917, the first congress of Sami people was held in the Methodist Church in Tråante (Tråante is South Sami for Trondheim) at the initiative of Elsa Laula Renberg, an advocate of Sami rights and leader of the Sami Women's Association. The Norwegian Sami Parliament (Tråante), Trondheim Municipality, South Trondelag County Council and North Trondelag City Council will mark this historical event with a shared celebration. Associations and institutions from Sápmi and the Nordic region have been invited to join the anniversary from all the cultural fields including music, film, theatre, literature, sports, visual arts, traditional handicrafts, food and religion.

2017/01/10

Last week on view: ‘The Missing One’

'The Missing One' installation view. Photo: OCA / Herman Dreyer

An exhibition exploring themes of futurism, science fiction and spirituality with artists from Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka

On view until Sunday 15 January 2017
Opening hours: Wed–Sun: 11:00–17:00




Office for Contemporary Art Norway
Nedre gate 7, 0551 Oslo
www.oca.no I info@oca.no

Klikk her for å lese pressemeldingen på norsk.

Taking the tropes and technologies of science fiction as a thematic beginning, 'The Missing One' is an inter-galactic, inter-generational exhibition assembling artworks from across Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

The exhibition is part of an institutional concern to bring to Norway the plurality of practices and histories at the forefront of international artistic debates around the world. As such, 'The Missing One' stands within a wider impetus to focus on the South Asia region and beyond, which was initiated through The Critical Writing Ensembles, a project to commission, debate and publish critical writing. Launched in Baroda, India, in 2015, and in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 2016, the Ensembles invited art writing peers from the region and beyond (including Norway) to discuss comparative art histories and writing practices. In 2018 this focus on South Asia will be followed by a solo exhibition of the seminal Indian artist Vivan Sundaram.

'The Missing One''s starting point is a 1920s painting by Gaganendranath Tagore referencing the science fiction short novel The Story of The Missing One by J.C. Bose. The story was published in 1896, and is thought to be one of the first science fiction stories in the Bengali language. A research scientist, Bose pioneered wireless communication and a crater on the moon bears his name. Tagore’s Resurrection, from which the exhibition departs, looks skyward to imagine a cosmological vortex in the heavens.

In the 20th century, speculative fiction and cinema allowed expression for the wonder and anxieties of the encounter with an ever-accelerating modernity. Future worlds became possible even as hostile aliens, dystopian planets and galactic conflict echoed the real schisms of earthbound life. Exotic references added esoteric appeal – for Arthur C Clarke, the ancient palace complex of Sigiriya in Sri Lanka became a portal and Rama lent his name to a spaceship. The extra-terrestrial or non-human, even in popular film and TV, became a composite of non-western traits.

Re-territorialising these memes, the exhibition speculates whether a South Asian view can be articulated by assembling and repositioning works that speak to the themes and aesthetics of the genre. It troubles the modern view that science and spirituality must remain at odds. We time-travel, then, a hundred years or so to the turn of the 20th century in South Asia, from the late 1990s, to the present, to see how the experiences of artists who benefitted from all the advancements of the modern age might relate to themes around science and spirituality that are central to our genre.

Curated by Nada Raza and produced by OCA for its Oslo presentation, the first iteration of 'The Missing One' was presented within the Dhaka Art Summit in 2016, with the support of the Samdani Art Foundation.

For more information, please contact OCA’s Communication Manager Tara Hassel.

OCA'S NOTATIONS
'The Missing One', in Oslo, is part of OCA’s continuous programming: Notations. OCA's 'Notations' unfold as a series of programmatic activities – performing, writing, thinking, fragmenting, exhibiting, moving, eating and socialising – that explore the desire for the institution to reflect upon the potential for artistic practice as an alchemical sphere of public action.