Press Releases


2018/04/30

Offsite and Closing Events of 'Let the River Flow. The Sovereign Will and the Making of a New Worldliness'

Holsbekken. Photo: Holm/Jørgensen

Norsk versjon Sámegiel veršuvdna

OCA ANNOUNCES

The upcoming events linked to the exhibition ‘Let the River Flow. The Sovereign Will and the Making of a New Worldliness’:

1. Offsite Event
A performative walk along the Holsbekken creek with facts, fiction, sound, language and speculation
As part of Holsbekken (RGB), a work by Geir Tore Holm and Søssa Jørgensen

Saturday 12 May 2018, 12:00–16:00
Skiptvet, Østfold County

2. Offsite Event
A sensory walk and a concert promoting a deep listening to Áillohaš’s The Bird Symphony
As part of Singing along to whooper swans – talking with the rocks – Goase Dušše revisited by Elin Már Øyen Vister

Sunday 27 May 2018, 12:00–16:00
Sinober, Lillomarka

3. Closing Event of the Exhibition at OCA
A series of talks about the Áltá Action and other forms of affirmative cultural thinking during the 1970s and today

Sunday 3 June 2018, 11:00–16:00
Office for Contemporary Art Norway
Nedre gate 7, 0551 Oslo
www.oca.no / info@oca.no

OCA is pleased to announce the first offsite event of the exhibition ‘Let the River Flow. The Sovereign Will and the Making of a New Worldliness’: a performative walk along the Holsbekken creek as part of Holsbekken (RGB), by artists Geir Tore Holm and Søssa Jørgensen.

Parallel to their video, photography, sculpture, sound and performance-based work, Geir Tore Holm and Søssa Jørgensen’s practice focuses on mediating, writing and teaching about contemporary art. In 1993 they started Balkong, using their apartment as an exhibition space, to find alternative ways of making and presenting art. With artists from Thailand, they set up the Gildeskål-based Sørfinnset skole / the nord land in 2003, in Nordland county. This ongoing project questions the exploitation of nature, and focuses on the exchange of knowledge in a broad aesthetic understanding of the ecological realities in which societies, humans and nature are involved. A few years ago, Holm and Jørgensen relocated to Skiptvet, in the Østfold county, to the south-east of Oslo, an area surrounded by fields and forests.

Holsbekken (RGB) consists of two parts: a sculptural installation and a performative walk. The installation piece at OCA is composed of water from the eponymous stream running beside their house, mixed with yeast. A surveillance video from Holsbekken is continuously displayed throughout the exhibition at OCA in Oslo. Signals of activity in the water from the creek interfere with the video in real time. The Holsbekken creek flows into Glomma, the longest and largest river in Norway, whose 621-kilometre course has a drainage basin that covers 13% of Norway’s land area, in the south-eastern part of the country.

Furthermore, here is an abundance of water which is used for domestic, agricultural and industrial purposes in almost all parts of the country and at all times. Though the environmental conditions in Norwegian rivers and lakes are better compared to other European countries, there are wide regional variations, and the environmental conditions are poorest where the population density is highest.

On 12 May, from 12:00 to 16:00, Holm and Jørgensen will present the second and complementary part of their work on view at OCA alongside the Holsbekken creek. The performative walk includes discussions about a number of fluvial issues focusing on facts, stories, languages, expectations and speculations on the subject.

This is an outdoor activity, so please check the weather forecast for the day, and bring appropriate shoes and clothing. Food will be served on site. The event has a maximum capacity limit and consequently guests will be admitted on a first-come-first-served basis. If you’re interested in attending, please email Liv Brissach at liv@oca.no with a subject line "Holsbekken (RGB) Walk”.

Detailed instructions including travel arrangements will be mailed to participants prior to the walk.

For more info and the artists’ bios, please click here.


About the upcoming offsite event on Sunday 27 May

On Sunday 27 May, Elin Már Øyen Vister will lead a sensory walk into the Lillomarka forest, north-east of Oslo, which will culminate in a deep-listening session to Áillohaš’s Goase Dušše (The Bird Symphony).

Norwegian artist and composer Elin Már Øyen Vister’s new work, Singing along to whooper swans – talking with the rocks – Goase Dušše revisited is the result of their deep-listening to Áillohaš’s celebrated Goase Dušše – Loddesinfoniija (The Bird Symphony, 1992), and reflects upon the process of its creation.

The Bird Symphony was a commission from the Music Drama Group/Swedish Broadcasting Corporation (Sveriges Radio). It premiered on Swedish Broadcasting Corporation on 22 October 1992. This one-hour-long symphony of nature was put together using a multitude of field recordings made in different parts of Sápmi, and was mixed in Áillohaš’s cottage in Beattet (Pätikkä), on the Finnish side of Sápmi, together with the Swedish sound technician Mikal Brodin. The work was produced by Gunilla Gustafsson (later Bresky) and Sven Åke Landström. The timeless quality of The Bird Symphony accentuates the relevance of its environmental messages today. Øyen Vister comments, "Áillohaš’s piece is a call to listen to the sounds of life, and a warning that ‘nature is dying’ (Áilu-loddemánná). It was and still is today, in an era of global ecological crisis, ahead of its time and is more relevant now than ever.”

This is an outdoor activity, so please check the weather forecast for the day, and bring appropriate shoes and clothing. Food will be served on site. The event has a maximum capacity limit and consequently guests will be admitted on a first-come-first-served basis. If you’re interested in attending, please e-mail Liv Brissach at liv@oca.no with a subject line "The Bird Symphony Concert”.

Detailed instructions including travel arrangements will be mailed to participants prior to the walk.

For more info and the artist’s bio, please click here.


About the closing event of ‘Let the River Flow’ on 3 June 2018

The exhibition ‘Let the River Flow’ closes with a series of talks about the Áltá Action, and other forms of affirmative cultural thinking during the 1970s and today. The event includes presentations by Marry Áilonieida Somby on writing and literature in the making of the Action; Pauliina Feodoroff will present her work at the intersection of ecological restoration and film; scholar Áine Mangaoang will address the relationship between songs and rebellion; and renowned curator Megan Tamati-Quennell will connect the Álta action to parallel moments in Maori history. Nabil Ahmed will discuss recent research on environmental regulation, spatial and media practices and the law, in connection with current challenges across Sápmi.


About the ‘Let the River Flow’ exhibition and its opening hours in Nedre gate 7, Oslo

The Áltá-Guovdageino Action (c. 1978–82) changed the course of Sámi and Nordic history. This exhibition showcases the role of Sámi artists in the action, and the solidarity of non-Sámi counterparts. It also presents contemporary artistic positions, both Sámi and international, exploring the legacy of this Eco-Indigenous uprising today, at a time of growing global Indigenous power.

Opening dates: Thursday 12 April–Sunday 3 June 2018
Opening hours: Wednesday–Sunday: 11:00–17:00

For more info about the exhibition, please click here.